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Wed - May 17
Eucharistic Holy Hour For Religious Vocations

Bishop Donald Hying will lead us in prayer and present: The importance of the family in supporting vocations to the priesthood and religious life.


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The Holy Rosary

The Rosary is a Scripture-based prayer, which begins with the Apostles' Creed, and summarizes the great mysteries of the Catholic faith. The Our Father, which introduces each mystery, is from the Gospels. The first part of the Hail Mary is the angel's words announcing Christ's birth and Elizabeth's greeting to Mary. St. Pius V officially added the second part of the Hail Mary. The Mysteries of the Rosary center on the events of Christ's life. There are four sets of Mysteries: Joyful, Sorrowful, Glorious and--added by Pope John Paul II in 2002--the Luminous.

The repetition in the Rosary is meant to lead one into restful and contemplative prayer related to each Mystery. The gentle repetition of the words helps us to enter into the silence of our hearts, where Christ's spirit dwells. The Rosary can be said privately or with a group. To read more, click here.

Taken from: http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/devotionals/rosaries/how-to-pray-the-rosary.cfm

The History of the Rosary

The historical root of the Rosary can be traced to 290 AD, when the hermits used stones and sticks to count the prayers. Irish Monks were required to pray the 150 Psalms from the Hebrew Scripture and needed a system of counting and tracking their prayer. They divided the Psalms into groups of three with fifty Psalms in each group. They read and prayed the Psalms in Latin, the ordinary people not being able to read or know Latin and desiring to pray with the Church, devised a set of prayers based on the 150 count. Over time this devised form developed into what we know as the Rosary today. The 150 Psalms at one point became 150 Paters (Our Fathers) and then changed to 150 Aves (Hail Marys). Eventually other prayers were added. Basically the development began with the Scripture, and the Rosary continues today to be a Scripturally based prayer. The origin of meditation on the mysteries of the Rosary can be attributed to the Carthusian monks of the fifteenth century. To read more, click on the following link.

Taken from: http://www.familyrosary.org/TheRosary/ExplanationandHistory/HistoryofTheRosary.aspx
http://www.familyrosary.org/TheRosary.aspx

Praying the Rosary is a wonderful way to meditate on the life of Christ, and grow in relationship with God. Begin by praying five decades of the Rosary each day.

Click on the buttons below to pray and meditate on the mysteries of the Rosary. If you are leading the Rosary and would like a copy of the presentation with note pages, call Debbie Dellumo in the parish office. Scripture is taken from the New American Bible, Revised Edition March 9, 2011


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